Word: Fall

for the righteous falls seven times and rises again, but the wicked stumble in times of calamity.” Proverbs 24:16

“As for what was sown on rocky ground, this is the one who hears the word and immediately receives it with joy, yet he has no root in himself, but endures for a while, and when tribulation or persecution arises on account of the word, immediately he falls away.” Matthew 13:20-21

Hebrew: 5307. naphal
Original Word: נָפַל
Phonetic Spelling: (naw-fal’)
Definition: A primitive root; to fall, in a great variety of applications (intransitive or causative, literal or figurative) — be accepted, cast (down, self, (lots), out), cease, die, divide (by lot), (let) fail, (cause to, let, make, ready to) fall (away, down, -en, -ing), fell(-ing), fugitive, have (inheritance), inferior, be judged (by mistake for palal), lay (along), (cause to) lie down, light (down), be (X hast) lost, lying, overthrow, overwhelm, perish, present(-ed, -ing), (make to) rot, slay, smite out, X surely, throw down.

Greek: 4624. skandalizó
Original Word: σκανδαλίζω
Phonetic Spelling: (skan-dal-id’-zo)
Definition: cause to stumble, cause to sin, cause to become indignant, shock, offend.
Cognate: 4624 skandalízō – properly, set a snare (“stumbling-block“); (figuratively) “to hinder right conduct or thought; to cause to stumble” – literally, “to fall into a trap” (Abbott-Smith).

Webster’s Dictionary 1828 – Online Edition
FALL, verb intransitive preterit tense fell; participle passive fallen. [Latin fallo, to fail, to deceive, Gr.; Heb. to fall Fail agrees better with Heb., but these words may have had one primitive root, the sense of which was to move, to recede, to pass. See Foul.]

 

*4. To depart from the faith, or from rectitude; to apostatize. Adam fell by eating the forbidden fruit.

*6. To come to an end suddenly; to vanish; to perish.

*7. To be degraded; to sink into disrepute or disgrace; to be plunged into misery; as, to fall from an elevated station, or from a prosperous state.

*8. To decline in power, wealth or glory; to sink into weakness; to be overthrown or ruined. This is the renowned Tyre; but oh, how fallen.

*9. To pass into a worse state than the former; to come; as, to fall into difficulties; to fall under censure of imputation; to fall into error or absurdity; to fall into a snare. In these and similar phrases, the sense of suddenness, accident or ignorance is often implied; but not always.

To seem more examples, click here: Webster’s Dictionary 1828 – Online Edition

 

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